Weekend Roundup Sept 12-14

Son Heung-Min, already on the scoresheet in the Champions League & German Cup, scored his 1st goal in the Bundesliga season. Much going on, so keep up with us!

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K-League Classic results this weekend:

Saturday, September 13
Steelers
1
Final
Seongnam
0
FC Seoul
3
Final
Incheon
1
Busan IPark
1
Final
Ulsan
3
Sunday, September 14
Jeonbuk
1
Final
Gyeongnam
0
Jeju United
0
Final
Suwon
0
Sangju Sangmu
1
Final
Dragons
0

 

Asian Game results:

Korea men’s:

Korea Women’s:  wins 5-0 vs Thailand in their first group match:

>And of course you got word on the U16 Taeguk Warriors quarterfinal win against Japan with Lee Seung-Woo’s brace on Sunday.  Stay tuned later in the post, we have the midweek schedule for Champions League, Asian Champions League, Asian Games and the U16 AFC Championship semifinal match. First some notes about this weekend club results:

      • Weekend got off to a decent start with Son Heung-Min rested on the bench for Leverkusen. He came off at the 61st minute and helped put Leverkusen ahead of Werder Bremen 3-2. Lead wouldn’t last as they conceded late. FT 3-3. Still, his 73′ strike was pure class, the turn and shot pulled off brilliantly, take a look:

 

 

    • Ki Sung-Yeung & Swans visited Stamford Bridge – 2 unbeaten EPL teams duking it out and only one would emerge with all 3 points. Of course it was Chelsea but it started out brightly for the Swans. Ki’s run and cross was crucial to what would be an on goal conceded by Chelsea.  
  •  No Kim Bo-Kyung for Cardiff.  With their loss on Saturday, they fall to 15th in the Championship table.

   K-League Classic update via twitter, magic happening in the table *unless you’re a Jeonnam supporter:

 

>>We may have more on midweek listings later but here’s the skinny you need to know:

 

TUESDAY September16

Champions League: AS Monaco vs Bayer Leverkusen 2:45 pm EST / 3:45 am Korea Time

– The first group stage match of Group C.  Having rested for some of the Werder Bremen match, Son is expected to start.

English Championship: Bolton v Rotherham United 3:00 pm EST/ 4:00 am Korea Time

English Championship: Cardiff v Middlesbrough 2:45 pm EST / 3:45 am Korea Time

 

WEDNESDAY September 17:

– U-16 AFC Championship Semifinals Korea vs Syria (SBS Sports) 6am EST / 7pm Korea Time
– Asian Champions League FC Seoul vs Western Sydney (KBS N, SBS Sports) 6:30am EST / 7:30 pm Korea Time
– Asian Games Korea Men’s vs Saudi Arabia (KBS2)  7am EST / 8pm Korea Time
– Asian Games Korea Women’s vs India 7am EST / 8pm Korea Time

WHAT are you going to be able to watch, particularly with the plethora of options Wednesday?  Lee Seung-Woo and company in the U16 tourney or Park Joo-Ho/Kim Shin-Wook and Kim Jin-Su in their campaign to win Asian gold and military exemption? or the ladies continuing to dominate their group? Let’s not forget FC Seoul being the lone KLeague club left to represent in the Asian Champions League after knocking out Pohang. So many matches, it’s a good problem to have I suppose…

 

 

Finally an update on the WSL coming to you (fashionably) late: Chelsea Ladies got a late winning goal by Ji So-Yun on Sept 5th and beat Arsenal 2-3, but had only a day in between to rest up for the Cup semifinals vs Manchester City. They ran out of gas and lost 1-0.  Man City go on to face Arsenal for the Cup title. Let’s go back to Ji’s goal scored on Arsenal back on Sept 5 (with help from teammate Yuki Ogimi):

8 Comments

  1. Probably, on Wednesday, catch first half of Korea-Syria U16’s then switch over to Asian Games. Or maybe I can VPN and use Naver’s 4 streams at a time function if my computer wants to be nice and not lag…

  2. wow, it’s an all korean u16 final. you know, one of the sad things about reunification (aside from the big important things like human rights, people having enough food, and families being reunited) is how powerful a sports country korea would be. i’m always amazed that north koreans do anything well at all considering their situation. if you see how well south korea does compared to japan, especially considering their higher population, imagine what korea might have been doing these last couple decades as well as in the future as a unified country.

    • This idea has come up before (related to football), the idea of a South Korean attack with a North Korean defense. There would maybe be a small improvement, but not a significant one I think.

      It’s not terribly surprising that NK can do well at athletics. The regime has money, it’s just how they spend it (on themselves and projects that boost their image – ie athletics).

      • If we’re talking hypothetically of re-unification – there would be benefits for Korean football but I agree – small improvement initially. But the geo-political situation in a post-unification Korea would have a number of consequences (both positive and negative) but as it relates to Korean football, mostly positive. After an undefined period of adjustment (a la East Germany finding itself and reintegrating themselves with the West), with North Korea’s current population roughly 25 million & South Korea’s 50 million – 75 million total (if I haven’t drank too much soju to add properly)… That would be approaching Germany’s 80 million currently. In that scenario, Korea will have increased their potential talent pool AND the added benefit of not having to spend excess capital/money/conscripted men on military reinforcements and equipment on the DMZ. We wouldn’t necessarily have to draft Son Heung-Min and Lee Seung-Woo back to join Sangju Sangmu for their military tour.

        But easier said than done – the psychological scarring from decades of totalitarian barbarism and healing from it won’t be easy. Adding to the topsy turvy cultural adjustment as people from North and South learn to adapt and live with each other – transition will be far more difficult than Germany had it in the early 90’s. Still, despite the challenges – it can be done. Reunification is one dream that I hope to see realized in my lifetime. This game coming up does make me sad to see in many ways.

        • Certainly there could be benefits, but they would be far down the line. There is also the small issue of could the KFA properly develop players/the team. The number of players available doesn’t matter if they aren’t coached well.

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